Routers, Hubs, Switches

Router                                                                                                                                                                                                         a computer networking device that forwards data packets across a network toward their destinations, through a process known as routing. Routing occurs at Layer 3 (the network layer i.e. Internet Protocol (IP)) of the OSI seven-layer protocol stack.  (source: Wikipedia.org)

Switch                                                                                                                                                                                                         A device for changing the course (or flow) of a circuit. The prototypical model is a mechanical device (for example a railroad switch) which can be disconnected from one course and connected to another. The term “switch” typically refers to electrical power or electronic telecommunication circuits. In applications where multiple switching options are required (e.g., a telephone service), mechanical switches have long been replaced by electronic variants which can be intelligently controlled and automated. (source: Wikipedia.org)

Hub                                                                                                                                                                                                                    A device for connecting multiple twisted pair or fiber optic Ethernet devices together, making them act as a single segment. Hubs work at the physical layer (layer 1) of the OSI model. Hubs are either active or passive. Active hubs repeat the signal received at one port out each of the other ports (but not the original one). The device is thus a form of multiport repeater. Ethernet hubs are also responsible for forwarding a jam signal to all ports if it detects a collision.                   (source: Wikipedia.org)

Click here to learn all about them in great detail at MakeItSimple.com.

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